"Learning basic Twelve Step philosophy and language can open the lines of communication," continued Cathy. "Once you understand some Twelve Step principles, concepts such as powerlessness, spiritual awakening, higher power and making amends, they will seem less like cult mantras and more like the simple guides they are intended to be." A Twelve Step program is one that adapts the Twelve Steps of AA to fit the particular needs of a mutual-help group. Narcotics Anonymous, Al-Anon, Alateen, Gamblers Anonymous, Nicotine Anonymous, and Adult Children of Alcoholics are examples of groups with a Twelve Step foundation.

First developed in 1935 by Bill Wilson & Dr. Bob during the founding of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), The 12 Steps are a program of recovery designed to help individuals suffering from alcoholism and addiction attain long-lasting, contented sobriety. The 12 Steps outline a path to spiritual progress through a series of actions designed to elicit what The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous refers to as a “psychic change” – a complete mental, emotional and spiritual shift in perception.


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This is another nice tool to bring your accidentally deleted files back to life. SoftPerfect File Recovery (scroll down on the page to download the program, skip the EaseUS recommendation) was primarily developed to help you rescue data that was accidentally deleted from hard disks, USB flash drives, SD and CF cards, etc. It supports popular file systems such as FAT12/16/32, NTFS, and NTFS5 with compression and encryption. The program runs under Windows XP through Windows 10.

But Twelve-Step Facilitation therapy is still a tried-and-true proven approach. It is far more than advising a patient to “go to AA” and providing them a list of meeting locations and times. In Twelve-Step Faciliation, the therapist actively probes and nudges, encouraging not only attendance, but participation, in meetings; it explains the potential benefits of working with a sponsor and promotes the individual developing a relationship with a sponsor; it explores problems or psychological resistances to attendance, participation, actual “working the steps,” and the development of a sponsor-sponsee relationship; and it opens the door to “AA-related activities” such as volunteer service to one’s AA “home group” or AA “clubhouse” and involvement with AA-related social events, retreats, and local and state conventions.
This is sort of an obvious one, but helpful to recognize. The easier it is to acquire alcohol, the more likely you are to consume it. The same goes for anything desirable. Accessibility plays a very important role in underage drinking, though. If it’s kept out of the hands of minors, then they can’t drink it! This idea is applicable at all ages. Keep yourself out of situations that involve alcohol and you won’t become an alcoholic.

Once the person has safely detoxed from alcohol, a comprehensive rehabilitation program is the best step. These programs offer intensive therapy to help clients understand the root causes of their addiction and change their behaviors toward intoxicating substances. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) recommends remaining in a rehabilitation program for 90 days, or three months.
First developed in 1935 by Bill Wilson & Dr. Bob during the founding of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), The 12 Steps are a program of recovery designed to help individuals suffering from alcoholism and addiction attain long-lasting, contented sobriety. The 12 Steps outline a path to spiritual progress through a series of actions designed to elicit what The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous refers to as a “psychic change” – a complete mental, emotional and spiritual shift in perception.
We have never called alcoholism a disease because, technically speaking, it is not a disease entity. For example, there is no such thing as heart disease. Instead there are many separate heart ailments, or combinations of them. It is something like that with alcoholism. We did not wish to get in wrong with the medical profession by pronouncing alcoholism a disease entity. We always called it an illness, or a malady—a far safer term for us to use.[96]
Ascites, the accumulation of fluid in the abdominal cavity is most commonly caused by cirrhosis of the liver. Some of the other causes of ascites include portal hypertension, congestive heart failure, blood clots, and pancreatitis. The most common symptoms include increased abdominal girth and size, abdominal bloating, and abdominal pain. Treatment depends on the cause of ascites.
Attitudes and social stereotypes can create barriers to the detection and treatment of alcohol abuse. This is more of a barrier for women than men. Fear of stigmatization may lead women to deny that they are suffering from a medical condition, to hide their drinking, and to drink alone. This pattern, in turn, leads family, physicians, and others to be less likely to suspect that a woman they know is an alcoholic.[35] In contrast, reduced fear of stigma may lead men to admit that they are suffering from a medical condition, to display their drinking publicly, and to drink in groups. This pattern, in turn, leads family, physicians, and others to be more likely to suspect that a man they know is an alcoholic.[54]

Standing by your friend or family member’s progress during and after treatment is important, too. For example, alcohol is everywhere. Even after recovery, your person will be in situations they can’t predict. Ways you can help include avoiding alcohol when you’re together or opting out of drinking in social situations. Ask about new strategies that they learned in treatment or meetings. Stay invested in their long-term recovery.
In one section, Dr. Miller discusses the importance of pharmacological therapy for the treatment of addiction. In another section he discusses the importance of AA in recovery, knowing full well that AA, with their definition of  "abstinence" does not welcome those receiving medication into their program. This is not only disingenuous, it is hypocritical. And AA's definition of abstinence, it is killing people. Those who have an addiction to opioids, when they relapse, too many of them, they die. They need to be on medication, and they need to stay on medication. Medication to treat this brain disorder of structure and function that we call addiction. They need to get their life back. And keep it. And if those still wedded to the ideology of AA, to the beliefs of the 1930's, when there were no medications for the treatment of addiction, don't like it, then oh well. Too bad.
Q. Alcoholism Steve 26 yr old suffered with bi-polar and the related drugs that eventually lead to his over dose. He died in where he felt a connection to the intellectual environment. After suffering with Steve for so many years, I am convinced that this disease is genetic; his grandmother also suffered with drug addiction and a mental disorder, but had that gene that must have been inherited by Steve. Any one in the area of mental health and genetic engineering Research? We want to set up or get involved with public awareness on the devastation of this disease which kills 100+ thousands in this country each year; yet society treats it as a social problem -- The advancement of mental research has been slow almost medieval -- Please help. No one, no family should have to suffer the way my beautiful son suffered and who had so much to give to humanity.
When you're putting money into your health, your future and your family's happiness, you need to make sure you're making the right decision for your Cheyenne alcohol and drug abuse rehabilitation clinic. While the best alternative may still be to speak to our hotline advisors so they can discuss your individual requirements, reading how others have reviewed or rated some of the addiction rehab clinics in or around your area is another great way to start.

It’s not always easy to see when your alcohol intake has crossed the line from moderate or social drinking to problem drinking. But if you consume alcohol to cope with difficulties or to avoid feeling bad, you’re in potentially dangerous territory. Drinking problems can sneak up on you, so it’s important to be aware of the warning signs of alcohol abuse and alcoholism and take steps to cut back if you recognize them. Understanding the problem is the first step to overcoming it and either cutting back to healthy levels or quitting altogether.
Definitely one of the best data recovery software out there, PhotoRec is widely acclaimed for its powerful file recovery over a wide variety of devices ranging from digital cameras to hard disks. It’s specially created to recover data like pictures, videos, documents, etc., from hard disks, CD-ROMs. Here are some of the features of PhotoRec recovery tool:
In a closed AA meeting, the only people who may attend are those who are recovering addicts (or those interested in learning more about overcoming their addiction). Open meetings allow the attendance of friends, spouses and family members. Whether you decide to go to a closed or open meeting depends exclusively on what you’re comfortable with. Some people would rather keep their recovery separate from the rest of their life. Others thrive on the support that loved ones can provide during meetings.
Jump up ^ Agrawal, A; Sartor, CE; Lynskey, MT; Grant, JD; Pergadia, ML; Grucza, R; Bucholz, KK; Nelson, EC; Madden, PA; Martin, NG; Heath, AC (2009). "Evidence for an Interaction Between Age at 1st Drink and Genetic Influences on DSM-IV Alcohol Dependence Symptoms". Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. 33 (12): 2047–56. doi:10.1111/j.1530-0277.2009.01044.x. PMC 2883563. PMID 19764935.
A condition characterised by a pathologic pattern of alcohol use causing a serious impairment in social or occupational functioning; also defined by the Joint Committee of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence & the American Society of Addiction Medicine as a “primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterised by … distortions in thinking, most notably denial.” A simpler, operational definition is persistent drinking that interferes with the person’s health, legal position, interpersonal relationships, or means of livelihood. Alcoholism is characterised by the regular intake of ≥75 g/day of alcohol.
What's to know about alcoholic liver disease? Alcoholic liver disease is the primary cause of chronic liver disease in the U.S. and can be fatal. It occurs as a result of chronic excessive consumption of alcohol. The first step of treatment will be to remove alcohol from the diet, but a liver transplant may also be necessary. Learn more about the disease here. Read now
The twelve steps of alcoholics anonymous do not come from the Oxford Groups because there were twelve apostles the  Oxford Groups practised six steps all of which AA adopted but also added six which had to do specifically with a non denominational or religious numinous power and the specific effects of alcohol addiction on the character on the afflicted.  As many addicts -- probably many more -- have been harmed by the ignorant prescription or pharmaceuticals to people in recovery for AA as have been harmed by a lay AA sponsor telling a member that all prescriptions are bad. .   
The mental obsession is described as the cognitive processes that causes the individual to repeat the compulsive behavior after some period of abstinence, either knowing that the result will be an inability to stop or operating under the delusion that the result will be different. The description in the First Step of the life of the alcoholic or addict as "unmanageable" refers to the lack of choice that the mind of the addict or alcoholic affords concerning whether to drink or use again.[20]
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